Joel Kinnaman Snags Sunset Strip Digs

Variety.com – It was Yolanda Yakketyyak, with her mysterious celebrity real estate ways, who first tattled to this eager-eared property gossip that uncommonly comely Swedish-born actor Joel Kinnaman — currently co-starring on “The Killing” — surreptitiously shelled out $2.45 million (via trust) for a revamped, 1970s mock-Med abode high in the hills above the Sunset Strip.

The two-story residence spans 2,542 square feet, according to marketing materials, with three city-view bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms uniformly slathered in identical tumbled stone tiles. The wood-floored, open-concept main living space has huge windows, beams across the ceiling, a concrete-faced catty-corner fireplace — one of three in the house — and a column-flanked sitting area just off the kitchen and dining area.

Many houses in the steep hills above the Sunset Strip lack proper yard space, but Mister Kinnaman’s new crib has an unusually large and flat grassy yard with stone-tiled terraces, a plunge-sized swimming pool and tree-framed views that extend to the towers of Century City and — on a particularly clear day — the Pacific Ocean.

Joel Kinnaman’s EASY MONEY III: LIFE DELUXE Hits UK Home Entertainment October 20th!

Easy_Money_III_-_Blu-rayScreenrelish.com – The third and final chapter in the acclaimed crime saga EASY MONEY (also known in as SNABBA CASH) sees ROBOCOP and THE KILLING’s rising star Joel Kinnaman return to the role that made his name. EASY MONEY III: LIFE DELUXE promises another intense thrill ride for genre fans as his antihero JW seeks answers to the whereabouts of his beloved sister, as well as revenge for his past dark deeds.

Below we have the official press release confirming EASY MONEY III: LIFE DELUXE will arrive on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD from the 20th October!

Hollywood’s latest “leading man” discovery Joel Kinnaman (Robocop; The Killing; The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) stars in “Easy Money III: Life Deluxe”, the explosive final chapter of the hit Nordic Noir trilogy out on DVD, Blu-ray and Download 20th October 2014 through Icon Film Distribution.

Combining elements of the hugely popular and utterly compelling Nordic Noir genre with the pure essence of classic Hollywood gangster sagas (particularly “The Godfather” trilogy), “Easy Money III: Life Deluxe” is an intelligent, action-packed finale to one of the best crime thriller trilogies seen in recent years.

Joel Kinnaman and Matias Verela (The Borgias) both deliver standout performances, while Jens Jonsson’s inventive direction delivers in spades, particularly during the film’s stunning and visually breathtaking bank robbery sequence.

“Entertaining, nail-biting, adrenalin-pumping…” 4* The Iris.

JW now lives in exile and is more than ever determined to find out what happened to his missing sister Camilla. Every trace leads him to the world of organized crime in Stockholm. Jorge is about to do his last score – the largest robbery in Swedish history. But during the complicated preparations he meets a woman from his past, Nadja. Martin Hägerström is chosen to go undercover into the Serbian mafia, in order to get its notorious boss Radovan Krajnic behind bars. When an assassination attempt is made on Radovan, his daughter Natalie is pulled into the power struggle within the Serbian mafia.

The Lowdown on Terrence Malick’s Three New Films

HollywoodReporter.comWill ‘Knight of Cups’ premiere this year?

Between 1973’s Badlands and 2011’s Tree of Life, Terrence Malick directed only five films before quickly releasing his sixth film, To The Wonder, in 2012. Now, at 70, Malick looks to increase his career output considerably with three new films: two narrative features, both in postproduction, and a documentary that’s been in the works for years. As Christian Bale recently told Indiewire, “Terry is on fire.”

As with all Malick projects, the new films are shrouded in secrecy. That’s possible because his inner circle and crew are small and extremely loyal, while his cast doesn’t know what footage the improvisational director will put into the final film. The films are reportedly nearing completion, two of them jam-packed with Hollywood’s biggest stars and the third soon to be set free after being held hostage by a contentious legal battle.

Inside Indie has combed through interviews, movie and music blogs and unauthorized set photos to determine what we actually do know about the next wave of Malick’s output.

1. Knight of Cups and The Untitled Austin Film are not part of the same story
When it was first announced in November 2011 that Malick would shoot his two narrative projects back-to-back with significant cast crossover — including Bale, Natalie Portman and Cate Blanchett — there was speculation that the films were companion pieces.

One of the strongest connections between the two films was thought to be Bale, who is the lead in Knight and was the first to be seen shooting with Malick, in Austin during the 2011 City Limits Music Festival. These concert scenes were later reported to only be part of preproduction, and Bale told Indiewire he didn’t think he’d be in the Untitled Austin Film: “With Knight of Cups I was there the whole time. The other one I unfortunately wasn’t able to do everything I was meant to do, so I ended up doing like three, four days on that. Which in Terry’s world means you’re never going to see me in it.”

2. What we know about Knight of Cups
According to its backers Film Nation, “Knight of Cups is a story of a man, temptations, celebrity and excess.” Producer Sarah Green confirmed that the film was about the modern-day L.A. movie business with Bale set as the lead, reportedly (not confirmed) playing a depressed screenwriter. Portman, Blanchett, Isabel Lucas, Joe Manganiello, Wes Bentley, Joel Kinnaman, Antonio Banderas and Freida Pinto round out the cast.

3. Will Knight screen this year?
It has been two years since production wrapped on Knight, which is not an especially long postproduction for Malick. Yet protege and member of the Malick inner circle A.J. Edwards revealed during the Berlin Film Festival that both films would premiere this year. Then earlier this summer, the film’s Italian distributor Ernesto Grassi stated that Knight would come out in limited release in the U.S. later this year.

Possibly the biggest sign that Knight is nearing the finish line has come from the cast.

As Martin Sheen, Rachel Weisz, Mickey Rourke, Gary Oldman and Billy Bob Thornton can all testify, there is no shame in ending up on the freewheeling Malick’s cutting room floor, but no one wants the embarrassment Adrien Brody experienced of promoting a role (The Thin Red Line) only to later discover that role has been cut or greatly reduced by Malick.

So it was very revealing that in spring 2014, Knight of Cups’ supporting actors Manganiello, Banderas and Lucas giddily reported they had made Knight’s final cut. Banderas was even given set photos to approve, while Lucas said she was called in for an ADR session. Feeding the flame, Film Nation gave THR the first official photos from the film and revealed footage to foreign investors during Cannes.

‘The Killing’ TV Series Better Than Original Danish Show? Cast Joel Kinnaman Signs With WME

KDramaStars.com – Fans of “The Killing” TV series, which ended a few weeks ago, know that it’s a remake of the original Danish show “Forbrydelsen” but AMC and Netflix networks outdid themselves and gained a cult following in the process. Meanwhile, cast Joel Kinnaman signs on with WME.

Morwenna Ferrier wrotefor The Guardian that “The Killing” TV series more than held its own compared to the original from which it was based on.

She also described Detective Sarah Linden (Mirreille Enos) as a “higher functioning” Lund, the lead in “Forbrydelsen.”

“Linden may be a little watery compared to Lund, but once you’ve stopped comparing the two, Enos is great – her shaky patience, her dogged policework, her glowering expression (which is filmed 70% of the time through a car windscreen),” she wrote. “My only real gripe is how her (really good) hair never goes frizzy in the damp.”

But the publication said that the revelation in “The Killing” TV series was Joel Kinnaman who plays Detective Holder who was more interesting than her counterpart in the Danish show. An addict who is trying to turn his life around through his very strong faith.

“His slippery relationship with vegan food, his never-dry hair, the way he gets all overexcited when he gets to “go method” with gangs. Then there’s his rolling, laconic accent, which he has a lot of fun with. Completely absurd and untranslatable, but it sort of makes him,” she wrote.

Speaking of “The Killing” cast Joel Kinnaman, report from The Hollywood Reportersaid that the Swedish actor has signed on with the William Morris Endeavor talent agency.

Joel Kinnaman will next be seen in “Run All Night” produced by Warner Bros., along with “Taken” star Liam Neeson, and “Child 44,” described as a Soviet-era thriller. In that film he will star alongside “Mad Max Fury” star Tom Hardy and “Prometheus” cast Noomi Rapace.

WME Signs Joel Kinnaman

Deadline.com – WME has signed The Killing‘s Joel Kinnaman, the agency said in a wide announcement. The Stockholm-bred thesp crossed over stateside as the street-tough Detective Holder on AMC’s cop show and starred in MGM and Sony’s RoboCop reboot earlier this year. The Killing was revived for a fourth season on Netflix this month. Kinnaman, previously with CAA, stars opposite Liam Neeson in WB’s 2015 crime actioner Run All Night and has Summit/Lionsgate’s Child 44 with Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, and Noomi Rapace opening in April. The fast-ascending actor first broke out in his native Sweden thanks to roles in the Johan Falk film series and Daniel Espinosa’s Snabba Cash (Easy Money) trilogy. He also appeared in Espinosa’s English-language crime pic Safe House, Lola Versus, and David Fincher’s The Girl With THe Dragon Tattoo. Kinnaman continues to be repped by manager Shelley Browning at Magnolia and attorney Hansen Jacobson.

ECPATs ambassadör and supporter Joel Kinnaman

‘The Killing’ Star Joel Kinnaman Exits CAA (Exclusive)

Hollywoodreporter.com – Joel Kinnaman, the Swedish actor best known for AMC’s The Killing, has left CAA, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter.

The 34-year-old actor joined the agency in May 2013 after he and several other clients of manager Shelley Browning split with UTA. Browning clients Rosamund Pike and Noomi Rapace remain at CAA.

Kinnaman gained a following in Hollywood for his work in The Killing, which recently streamed its fourth and final season on Netflix. But the movie that was to have been his breakthrough into the mainstream, Robocop, fizzled in the U.S. when it was released earlier this year. (That deal was made by Browning and UTA before he signed with CAA.)

Kinnaman has two movies in the can: Run All Night, in which he stars with Liam Neeson (the movie will be released April 17, 2015 by Warner Bros.), and the Soviet-era set crime thriller Child 44 opposite Tom Hardy and Rapace. That film, which will coincidentally hit U.S. theaters the same day next April, was directed by Daniel Espinosa, the Swedish filmmaker who helmed Kinnaman in his international breakthrough movie, Snabba Cash.

The Killing Post Mortem: EP Veena Sud Talks That Last Scene, the Lost Kiss, an Offscreen Wedding and… a Season 5?

TVLine.com – By now, you have probably Netflix-binged The Killing‘s final season — and you no doubt have questions of the burning and nagging variety. (If you’re still making your way through the six-episode swan song, bookmark this story and return when you are finished.)

Well, we had questions too — loads of them. About that final scene. About the rumored Holder-Linden kiss. About the surprise cameo. About a possible fifth season. And, after talking to The Killing‘s puppet master Veena Sud, we now have answers.

TVLINE | Was it always your intention for Linden and Holder to pair up romantically in the end?
There were many different possibilities for how the story of Linden and Holder would end. That was one of them that we started to discuss at the beginning of this season, and that felt right. From the very beginning, I knew that her journey would have to end in a place of uneasy peace, where there were no good guys, there were no bad guys. There was a truce that she had to make with the world as it is versus the way she wanted the world to be. I always knew that finding that peace would be an inner journey at the very end for her. Holder says, “It’s not ghosts in front of you, it’s not the dead.” And that revelation of who is standing in front of her and who’s in her life was something that I instinctually knew [I wanted to get to] from the very beginning. I didn’t know it necessarily would be Holder. But seeing what’s in front of her and being present of that — the beauty of the world — was the place I wanted Sarah to get to at the end of her story. That’s one reason that visual of her standing in front of that beautiful cityscape in the main titles has been a recurring image over and over. It transforms over the course of the series. It’s a city of the dead that she’s looking at. And, in the end, it’s a city — ultimately — of the living. And that’s where she belongs.

TVLINE | Finding this peace allowed her to be open to a romantic relationship with Holder?
Finding the truth of what is in her life, and not running away… Linden is a runner. She runs away from everything in search of a better life. And she says that to Holder. “Home is here. And you are home. You are my best friend.”

TVLINE | Was the five-year time jump always in your plans as well?
I always knew that we would end the present-day story at the end of the season and come back five years later with Linden and Holder. The story would never end simply around the case, with Linden running away again. That would just feel like more of the same. There would always be a final reckoning between Holder and Linden. That final moment where she comes back, we viewed as the final movement of an opera. If there was anyplace where we could’ve possibly ended the story it would’ve been with her leaving Holder and permanently leaving Seattle forever. That would have been a very different end for the character. And she never would’ve found peace that way.

The Killing Final SeasonTVLINE | Were you on set when those two final scenes with Mireille Enos and Joel Kinnaman were shot?
Yes. The final shot [pictured, right] was the very last thing we shot. We organized it so that would be how everything would end. And it was tear-filled for Mireille, for myself, for Joel, for the crew… It was very bittersweet for all of us. We became a family and we loved these characters.

TVLINE | Was there much discussion or debate between the two actors about how it would go down?
There was no debate. At the beginning of the season, I sat down with Mireille and told her how her story would end, and she said not one word. Tears were just flowing from her eyes. And she looked at me and said, “It’s perfect. This is the end that she deserves.” I told Joel separately as well, and he got teary. And he said, “Let’s not talk any more about it. Let’s save it for the moment.” So, on the day, both of the actors felt like [they were conveying] the truth of these characters. And they did it so beautifully. Everyone was nervous about that last scene, of course. We were all really quiet during rehearsal and during lighting. And then when we were all done, that’s when everyone cried and hugged.

TVLINE | There’s a rumor that a kiss was filmed and not used. True?
It was not filmed. I knew I never wanted to film a kiss. That would have felt a little too pat. But, at one point, Jonathan Demme — who directed the finale — did a lovely crane shot that I decided not to use in the end. But it was a crane shot that tracked Holder approaching Linden, and then — discreetly before they came together — [the camera panned] away. So the crane shot dollies away and looks over this beautiful river and we’re looking at the skyline, but Joel and Mireille continued their action, which was him walking towards her, looking at each other and then… they didn’t really know what to do next. [Laughs] So they kissed! The funniest thing is, everyone was clustered around the monitors looking at the shot and the script supervisor and my producer, Kristen Campo, were the only people looking on the ground at Mireille and Joel, and Campos kept nudging me, “Look! Look!” And I was like, “I am! I’m looking at the shot!” So I never saw the kiss, but they did.

TVLINE | So Linden and Holder finally kissed and it wasn’t caught on tape?
No, it wasn’t. [Laughs]

TVLINE | That’s pretty funny. OK, moving on to other hot topics. Billy Campbell’s return as Richmond was a nice surprise. How did that come about?
It felt very natural that the final person who would pull the rug out from under Linden would be a man who had become her nemesis. They started out in a similar kind of world of attempting good and wanting good. But he went to the dark side. And rather than having an anonymous sergeant or lieutenant giving her the news ahead of the police commissioner, it [made sense that it] would be the mayor. And he would relish giving her the news. So we called Billy and said we’d love for you to come back, and he said, “Just tell me when.”

TVLINE | Why would someone as smart as Linden return to the scene of the crime to dispose of crucial evidence? I’m referring to her getting rid of the cell phone at the lake house.
We do stupid things when we commit crimes. The fallacy is that any of us are Sherlock Holmes or Agatha Christie. When we’re emotional, as clearly she was during and after this very unexpected event, people do really dumb things. And going back to the lake, for her, was, “Let me close this up emotionally. Let me say goodbye.” She loved this man. She loved him deeply — for a long time. And she killed him. And she hated him. And she was repulsed by him. So in the miasma of all of these emotions, she made a bad move.

TVLINE | Similarly, Holder — who had a lot to lose if the truth about Skinner’s murder got out, as he made very clear to Linden — pretty much confessed to the crime at his AA meeting. That also seemed a little sloppy.
The reality, and a lot of cops will tell you this, is that people want to talk. We’re not sociopaths by nature. For the most part, we’re human beings who do bad things, feel bad about them, want to confess, want to explain ourselves, want to have a reason for why we did what we did. I think that they reacted in a way that bad guys do all the time. So, yes, both of them should have known better.

TVLINE | The scene where Linden was closely tailing Skinner’s daughter in her car as the girl rode her bicycle – what would have happened had that other car not swerved in front of her?
My feeling is, Linden — at the last possible moment — would’ve stopped herself anyway [from running her over]. Throughout this season, we see both Linden and Holder going to the edge and coming back. And letting these darker emotions rule them in a way that, in this very unique circumstance in life, they’ve never had to confront. So I believe in her heart she would never kill a child; that’s not who she is. But the agony of watching this child — this hanging chad — that keeps coming back over and over to make things worse and worse for her, certainly tempted her.

TVLINE | Did Holder and Caroline end up getting married?
They did. And then they quickly divorced. [Laughs] They were different animals. He and Linden are the same.

TVLINE | Did Kyle end up going to jail for the murders or did Col. Rayne take the fall for him?
No, Kyle did.

TVLINE | You previously told me that Season 4 was definitely the end of the road for the show, but Holder and Linden are still alive. And, as one of my readers suggested, a big murder — like, say, Holder’s daughter — would be just the thing to pull both of them back into their old jobs…
[Laughs] We brought her to the end of her journey. She found the thing that she was looking for all along. It’s the end of the story.

ENTERTAINMENT: Streaming services home to the best TV has to offer

hillcountrynews.com – This summer, streaming services Netflix and Hulu are back in the spotlight again, releasing more self-produced television shows that are on par with — and in some cases above the level of traditional cable television series.

Dropped by AMC after three seasons, gritty crime drama “The Killing” was picked up by Netflix for a fourth season — said to the be show’s last.

The show, which features Mireille Enos, an actress virtually unknown before her Emmy-nominated run as Seattle detective Sarah Linden in “The Killing,” along with Swedish actor Joel Kinnaman (this year’s “Robocop” remake), is an exercise in episodic television.

As each season is essentially a long movie, rather than a series of individual episodes, “The Killing” seems tailor-made for Netflix, where shows are released a whole season at a time and binge-watching is the norm.

When it debuted on AMC in 2011, the pilot episode drew 2.7 million viewers — making it the No. 2 AMC debut behind “The Walking Dead.” However, the show drew the fire of critics and fans alike when it didn’t reveal the killer at the end of the first season. Numbers dropped off, as did ratings in the second season, and AMC cancelled the show after Season 2. However, negotiations with Netflix and Fox Television Studios helped bring the show back for a reasonably well-accepted third season.

But, the numbers just weren’t solid enough for a cable network show, and “The Killing” was killed again. Netflix came to the rescue, ordering a round of six episodes to give the show a final season and a chance to round out the storylines of its characters.

This kind of thing has become more and more common, but so has the advent of streaming services as international content distributors.

In the earlier days of cable television, the best shows produced overseas might eventually make their way to the U.S. by way of late-night syndication or by making an appearance on the long-running PBS show “Masterpiece Mystery.”

Shows like BBC’s “Prime Suspect,” starring Helen Mirren, and a number of shows featuring Agatha Christie’s famous sleuths Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple, as well as the outstanding “Foyle’s War,” starring Michael Kitchen, could only be found via PBS. Then, as the number of cable networks began to swell, more syndication deals became available, and more shows were visible to viewers — at least those who could sift through the myriad channels at the right time to find them.

Then came on-demand, and then streaming services to save the day. To the growing frustration of the cable monopolies, no longer do we have to sift through hundreds of often irrelevant television channels to find something interesting. Now, we can search by category, country of origin, or even by an actor we’re interested in.

To that end, I recommend you check out the following shows:

Netflix released a second season of neo-gothic horror series “Hemlock Grove,” penned by Brian McGreevy and Lee Shipman — a pair of writers from the Austin area.

“The Fall” is an Irish police drama starring Gillian Anderson (“The X-Files”). The first five-episode season is available on Netflix, and a second season just recently wrapped filming. If you’re wondering about Gillian Anderson with an accent, don’t. She’s of Irish descent, and a BBC regular who grew up in London.

Timely and engrossing, Hulu’s “The Promise” gives some historical perspective on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as a young woman learns about her grandfather’s involvement in the final years of Palestine under British rule in the 1940s.

If you haven’t seen “Lilyhammer,” starring Steven Van Zandt (“The Sopranos”), it’s a must-watch. This irreverant series was the first-ever Netflix original and one of its best.

RUN ALL NIGHT with Liam Neeson Gets 2015 Release Date

Broadwayworld.com – Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Run All Night,” starring Oscar nominees Liam Neeson and Ed Harris, as well as Joel Kinnaman, under the direction of Jaume Collet-Serra, has received a release date of April 17, 2015, according to Deadline.

In the film, Brooklyn mobster and prolific hit man Jimmy Conlon (Neeson), once known as The Gravedigger, has seen better days. Longtime best friend of mob Boss Shawn Maguire (Harris), Jimmy, now 55, is haunted by the sins of his past-as well as a dogged police detective who’s been one step behind Jimmy for 30 years. Lately, it seems Jimmy’s only solace can be found at the bottom of a whiskey glass.

But when Jimmy’s estranged son, Mike (Kinnaman), becomes a target, Jimmy must make a choice between the crime family he chose and the real family he abandoned long ago. With Mike on the run, Jimmy’s only penance for his past mistakes may be to keep his son from the same fate Jimmy is certain he’ll face himself…at the wrong end of a gun. Now, with nowhere safe to turn, Jimmy just has one night to figure out exactly where his loyalties lie and to see if he can finally make things right.

Shooting in and around New York City, primarily in Brooklyn and Queens, “Run All Night” also stars Vincent D’Onofrio (TV’s “Law & Order: Criminal Intent”), Boyd Holbrook (HBO’s “Behind the Candelabra”), Patricia Kalember (“Limitless”), Genesis Rodriguez (“Identity Thief”), and Academy Award nominee Nick Nolte (“Warrior”).

Collet-Serra directs from a screenplay by Brad Ingelsby. The film is being produced by Roy Lee (“The Departed”), Michael Tadross (“Gangster Squad,” “Sherlock Holmes”), and Brooklyn Weaver (executive producer, upcoming “Out of the Furnace”), with John Powers Middleton (TV’s “Bates Motel”) serving as executive producer.

The behind-the-scenes creative team includes director of photography Martin Ruhe (“The American”), production designer Sharon Seymour (“Argo”), Oscar-nominated editor Craig McKay (“The Silence of the Lambs”), and costume designer Cat Thomas (“The Heat”).